Modern

Modern (17)

1730-1939

Tuesday, 09 April 2019 08:58

Kibworth Hall

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On the north-east boundary of Kibworth Harcourt and to the east of Carlton Road stands Kibworth Hall, a grade ll listed building. The Hall is a square Georgian mansion standing in an extensive park and has an embattled parapet and hoodmoulds to the windows. Internally there was a fine staircase with an iron balustrade. Built c1825 by the Humfrey family who lived in the Old House, Kibwirth Harcourt. (See The Old House-Early Modern) John Benjamin Humfrey and his wife Charlotte moved into the newly built Hall. When John Benjamin Humfrey died in 1864 his son and heir Richard Buckley Humfrey…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Thursday, 04 April 2019 10:38

Kibworth Railway Station

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Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company formed in 1844 and ceased trading in 1922. The company opened Kibworth railway station in 1857 on what is now the Midland Main Line. Plans had been made in 1847 for a line from Leicester to Bedford but this did not materialise. The Midland Railway Company was running to Rugby at that time and was dependant on the London and North Western Railway for its path into London. The company was looking for an alternative route and a plan to route a line from Leicester to Bedford was reconsidered. This improved the possibilities of a railway station at or near Kibworth…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Article written by Angela Hall General James Lochhead Jack lived in Kibworth Harcourt from 1923 until 1962, he was a well-known local figure and is still remembered. Childhood and Early Military Career: James Lochhead Jack was born on 18thApril 1880, the eldest son of Peter and Mary Jack of Paisley. His father was a carpet manufacturer who owned a business in the town. Tragically his mother died when he was only seven. From an early age Jack developed a passion for horses and riding which lasted throughout his life. His father regularly hunted with the Lanark and Renfrewshire Foxhounds and…

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  • Reference

    This article first appeared in The Harborough Historian in 2006 and is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author, Angela Hall. The copyright of the article remains with Angela Hall.

    GenJackPlaque 2015

    In 2015, Leicestershire County Council installed a green plaque on The Old House in memory of “General Jack.”

  • Acknowledgement My thanks go to Mr. Kenneth Jack for allowing me access to General Jack’s memoirs and diaries and for his permission to reproduce certain extracts and photographs. I also acknowledge the Orion Publishing Group for their permission to quote extracts from the publication: General Jack’s Diary edited by John Terraine, Cassell Military Paperbacks 2000. ISBN 0304353205. Various extracts have been reproduced from the Market Harborough Advertiser.
Monday, 05 February 2018 15:37

The Big Dig

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The Big Dig
On the weekend of 25th and 26th July 2009 two hundred villagers, volunteer diggers and professional archaeologists worked together to open fifty test pits in the villages of Kibworth Beauchamp, Kibworth Harcourt and Smeeton Westerby in south Leicestershire.The event was organised by Michael Wood and his production team from Maya Vision International as part of their new BBC TV series the “Story of England” and under the direction of Access Cambridge Archaeology (ACA). Big Dig volunteers outside the Coach and Horses InnAndrew Southerden (pub licensee), Michael Wood and Prof. Carenza Lewis in foreground The volunteers gathered in Kibworth Grammar School…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Saturday, 25 November 2017 10:41

The White House and Nonconformity

Written by Kevin Feltham
The White House (The Crown Inn), 51 and 53 Leicester Road, Kibworth Harcourt. The first record of a house on the site of the White House was in the sixteenth century when the Parker family resided in a stone mansion on Leicester Road, Kibworth Harcourt where the White House stands today. Although the Parker family built a house on the site of the Old House, Main Street, Kibworth Harcourt and later in 1678 built the present Old House some members of the family continued to reside in the Leicester Road mansion. After the death of Geffery Parker in 1714, his…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Wednesday, 26 July 2017 12:21

Stained glass windows in St Wilfrid's Church

Written by Kevin Feltham
STAINED GLASS descriptions in St Wilfrid's Church starting with the north window to the right of the north porch (Harcourt side), proceed clockwise around the church : each description gives subject, inscription, date and artist.  Photographs will be added as obtained, although one photo of the stained glass depicting Walter de Merton in the bell tower, that is only visible inside the bell tower, is shown (see 13 below). 1. North Aisle: The Raising of Lazarus (John 11).  Scrolls above - I am the resurrection and the life. John 11:25; inscribed below: He cried with a loud voice / Lazarus come…
Wednesday, 01 February 2012 23:10

A sobering thought

Written by Kevin Feltham
During the sorting and archiving of St Wilfrid’s Parish records in the mid 1990s, a number of interesting documents came to light.  One such document which was written by James Beresford (Rector, 1812-1841) for distribution throughout Kibworth Beauchamp, Kibworth Harcourt and Smeeton Westerby (the ‘three townships’) is reprinted here together with the article that was delivered to every household.  Clearly the community must have been suffering from considerable drunkenness for this step to be taken!  What effect would such a step have today?  Would we need to replace drunkenness with drug addiction? Kibworth Rectory, Aug 17. 1834    In the…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Friday, 21 July 2017 10:09

St Wilfrid’s Church history: part 2 middle years (1660 - 1902)

Written by Kevin Feltham
After the Puritan period of John Yaxley (Rector, 1654-1660), Kibworth became a centre of Protestant dissent. In 1669, a 200 member conventicle (or clandestine religious meeting) of Presbyterians and Independents was held in Kibworth Harcourt. The leaders of the meeting were Matthew Clark (who might well have been related to the Richard Clark who helped eject Yaxley) and another ejected minister called Southam. A building, the Meeting House, off the Leicester Road (behind the White House on Leicester Road), was licensed for Presbyterian worship. John Jennings from West Langton moved to Kibworth in 1690 and set up as pastor of…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Thursday, 20 July 2017 14:40

The changing pews of St Wilfrid’s Church

Written by Kevin Feltham
Most English parish churches had no formal seating arrangements until the late 15th century. Prior to this, the congregation either stood, sat or knelt on the hard mud, sand or stone floors or leant against the outside walls or pillars. Services included stories from the bible, the reading of psalms, and prayers but little formal "music". Sermons or talks were very short. After Charles I was executed, the Puritans’ concept of lengthy teaching sermons soon helped speed up the introduction of seating! Families began to bring their own benches or chairs and group them together. This became more formalised with…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
Friday, 07 July 2017 13:21

Reminiscences of an Octogenarian, 1847 to 1934 part 2

Written by Kevin Feltham
“A Country Parish” from "Reminiscences of an Octogenarian, 1847 to 1934" by Edmund Knox  researched by Dr Kevin Feltham (2000) Edmund Arbuthnott Knox was born in 1847 and became a Sub-Warden of Merton College in Oxford before being offered the parish of Kibworth in 1885. He moved on, in 1891, to become Rector of Aston in Birmingham and eventually was appointed Bishop of Manchester. In later life he published “Reminiscences of an Octogenarian, 1847 to 1934” and this includes a chapter on his time in the Kibworths. This is a fascinating insight into the parish more than a century ago.…

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  • Acknowledgement The Kibworth Improvement Team thank and acknowledge the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford for permission to use images on this website of the college and archived material.
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